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Things to Do Over Chinese New Year

Things to Do Over Chinese New Year

It’s time to wipe the slate clean of the past 12 months and open the doors to a new year. Chinese New Year – also known as the Spring Festival, is a festival that celebrates the beginning of a new year on the Chinese Calendar. This year, 2021, Chinese New Year falls on a Friday, February 12th.

Many delightful traditions are practiced during this celebration. Even though celebrations will be kept low-key this year, they'll still be filled with the same traditions, ways, and of course, mouth-watering food.

So, here is a list of things you could do to celebrate and keep up with the traditions of Chinese New Year!

Try and make your own fortune dishes!

In Chinese culture, there are so many hugely symbolic food dishes. For example, serving two fish on New Year's Eve and saving one for the New Year, to represent surplus. Try making your own fortune dishes like Turnip Cake (Lo Bak Go, 蘿蔔糕), Nian Gao (Nin Gou in Cantonese, 年糕), Tang Yuan (湯圓), or Dumplings (餃子)! All of these foods represent a deep-rooted symbolic meaning of luck, prosperity into the new year, and auspiciousness. But, these treats can get addicting! Remember, they aren't only delicious, but they bring good luck too.

Visit a Chinese New Year flower market!

Just a warning: as times are constantly changing, we try our best to be as accurate as possible. However, please double check to make sure these events are happening!

Visit the infamous Chinese New Year flower market, featuring plenty of stalls filled with Orchids, Cherry Blossoms, Narcissus', Mandarins’, and Tangerines! The biggest flower market is at Victoria Park, and their opening times are from February 6th to February 11th! Flowers and fruits play a huge role in tradition, as they hold symbolic meanings as well. Be sure to check it out for symbolic decorations (if possible)!

Know more about the updated hours for the flower market here: www.fehd.gov.hk/english/events/lnyf2021/selling_point_status.html

Visit a temple for good luck and fortune!

Even though Chinese New Year is not a religious holiday, worshippers would typically visit a temple to make blessings and offerings to deities. By lighting incense, praying, and bringing fruit, they hope for the best luck and prosperity in the new year. We recommend visiting the Wong Tai Sin Temple and the Che Kung temple. But, be sure to follow common temple etiquette!

Indulge yourself in the Lunar New Year Lantern Carnival!

The Lunar New Year Lantern Carnival has always been one of the most anticipated events during the New Year. With spectacular lantern displays, orchestra performances, ethnic Chinese songs and dance, traditional stage art, and game booths, this event is nothing but fun and exciting. Illuminating lanterns are not only used as a source of light or decoration but to symbolize vitality and good luck. Make your own lantern or buy an extravagant one to participate!

Tiffany Chiang, Marketing Intern

Tiffany Chiang, Marketing Intern

Tiffany was born in Hong Kong SAR, China. Growing up, she lived in several different countries like Italy, China, Korea, United States, United Kingdom, and the United Arab Emirates. She’s multilingual and has a keen interest in bringing people together through diversity and culture.